Provided for consumer information—Monrovia is not currently growing this plant.

  • Overview
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Partial Sun
    Partial to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Low
    Once established, needs only occasional watering.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Average Landscape Size
    Slow growing to 3 to 6 feet tall and wide.
    Key Feature:
    Key Feature
    Drought Tolerant
    Blooms:
    Flowering Time
    Spring
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:ar-ROH-nee-uh mel-an-oh-KAR-puh
    Plant type:Shrub
    Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
    Sunset climate zones:1 - 6, 31 - 43
    Growth rate:Slow
    Average landscape size:Slow growing to 3 to 6 feet tall and wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Spring
    Flower color:White
    Design IdeasThis is one of the best American shrubs for wildlife and habitat gardens. Smaller size also makes it suitable for traditional landscapes in shrub and mixed borders, foundation and fence lines. Makes a fine informal hedge particularly attractive for its seasonal changes in suburban and rural sites such as farms and ranchettes. It will blend nicely with meadow and forest in the wild garden providing a valuable transition plant.
    Companion PlantsCombine with other natives such as Autumn Brilliance Apple Serviceberry, (Amelanchier x grandiflora 'Autumn Brilliance'), Eastern Redbud, (Cercis canadensis), Cherokee Sweetgum, (Liquidambar styraciflua 'Ward') and Big Bluestem, (Andropogon gerardii).
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish an extensive root system. Feed regularly during the growing season with a general purpose fertilizer. Prune annually in late winter to promote vigorous new growth.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Partial Sun
    Partial to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Low
    Once established, needs only occasional watering.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This native shrub is grouped into the rose family. It enjoys an enormous range throughout the eastern United States north into Canada. It's habitat is wet woods and swamps illustrating it's preference for damp conditions.
    Lore:
    The name chokeberry comes from the astringency of the fruit which is inedible when raw. Settlers made jam from the fruit after adding copious amounts of sugar.