• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Full shade
    Watering Needs:
    Needs wet or constantly moist soil.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Lacy fronds to 3 to 4 ft. tall and wide.
    Key Feature:
    Shade Loving
    Does not flower
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:a-THI-ree-um FI-liks FAY-mi-na
    Plant type:Fern
    Sunset climate zones:1 - 9, 14 - 24, 31 - 43
    Growth rate:Fast
    Average landscape size:Lacy fronds to 3 to 4 ft. tall and wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Does not flower
    Garden styleAsian/Zen
    Design IdeasA magnificent fern that fills out a shade garden far better than smaller types. Mass Lady Fern under trees where it's too dark for other plants. Use in pots or in atriums where their primitive, lacy character softens other more sculptural specimens. Also ideal for disguising mechanical parts of fountains or where over spray keeps planting areas too wet. A natural in banks and slopes with seeps or springs and rocky outcroppings shaded by forest.
    Companion PlantsA sizable ground fern in scale with larger shade loving plants. Group with unique Trilby Rhododendron, (Rhododendron x 'Trilby'), shade tolerant Madonna (Brooks Hybrid) Azalea, (Azalea 'Madonna') and Miniature Gardenia (Gardenia jasminoides 'Radicans'). Also works well with such shade-loving perennials as Lenten Rose (Helleborus x hybridus 'Royal HeritageTM Strain'), Lilac Beauty Lilyturf (Liriope muscari 'Lilac Beauty') and Bolivian Sunset Gloxinia (Gloxinia sylvatica 'Bolivian Sunset').
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Feed frequently during growing season with a general purpose fertilizer. Cut back old fronds after new growth begins in spring.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Shade
    Full shade
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: High
    Needs wet or constantly moist soil.
  • History & Lore
    A widespread species native to the forests of Europe and Asia. It is also native to nearly every state adapting to subspecies to cope with regional climate variations.
    Woodland ferns have long been used as basket liners by berry and mushroom gatherers. The plant's microscopic spores led the ancients to believe they could render one invisible.