Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Filtered sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: High
Needs wet or constantly moist soil.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Slow growing to 4 ft. tall, 3 ft. wide.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Water Garden
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Spring
Plant type:Fern
Deciduous/evergreen:Herbaceous
Growth rate:Slow
Average landscape size:Slow growing to 4 ft. tall, 3 ft. wide.
Foliage color:Green
Blooms:Spring
Flower color:Brown
Garden styleContemporary
Design IdeasThis great upstanding fern is exceptional form for wild gardens. Plant in masses under protective tree canopies and within woodland groves. A super choice for sideyards that need bold fillers. Such good form is also super valuable massed into modern gardens, particularly in the urban environment. May be added to shade borders for height or background and color. A stunning background for fountains and problem solver for acidic, light challenged gardens.
Companion PlantsThis fern thrives with other allies that lover sheltered woodland conditions such as Stop Light Foamy Bells, (x Heucherella 'Stop Light'), King of Hearts Bleeding Heart, (Dicentra x 'King of Hearts'), Ebony Knight Mondo Grass, (Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Ebkinzam') and Spotted Dead Nettle, (Lamium maculatum 'Red Nancy').
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Feed frequently during growing season with a general purpose fertilizer. Cut back old fronds after new growth begins in spring.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Filtered sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: High
Needs wet or constantly moist soil.
History:
The osmunda fern family includes just three genera. This one was classified to include nine species native to the Americas and Asia. It was derived from the name of an ancient Saxon god, Osmunder. The species likens the unique orange colored sporangia with that of the spice, cinnamon. This one is found in the North American forests and those of eastern Asia. Often called "flowering ferns" due to their sporangia which resemble flowers.
Lore:
These ferns are commercially harvested for osmunda fiber, an important horticultural product used in growing orchids.