Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Spreading mound 6 to 8 in. tall, 12 to 15 in. wide.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Deer Resistant
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Summer
Botanical Pronunciation:jer-AE-nee-um sin-NEE-ree-um
Plant type:Perennial
Deciduous/evergreen:Herbaceous
Growth habit:Spreading
Growth rate:Moderate
Average landscape size:Spreading mound 6 to 8 in. tall, 12 to 15 in. wide.
Foliage color:Gray-green
Blooms:Summer
Flower color:Pink
Garden styleCottage
Design IdeasA perfect spreading plant that is ideal massed into large zones of color. With its mat-like habit, it's also great for nooks and crannies in stepping stones or flagstone paving without mortar. Will spill over walls into a green waterfall of seasonal color. A good plant in large pots containing patio trees. Surprisingly heat resistant and adaptive to dry western gardens.
Companion PlantsThis little spreader won't compete with more upright perennials such as the purple-flowering East Friesland Meadow Sage (Salvia nemorosa 'East Friesland'), Fern Leaf Yarrow (Achillea x 'Moonshine') and particularly Fern-leaf Lavender (Lavandula multifida). For dramatic contrast use with Blue Oat Grass (Helictotrichon sempervirens) or pair this little pastel pink flower with the equally soft Elijah Blue Fescue (Festuca cinerea 'Elijah Blue').
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. As a groundcover, space plants 5 ft. apart, (closer for faster coverage). Control weeds with mulch until the plants cover the area.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
History:
This species like most of its kin is native to Europe, and in particular the Pyrenees Mountains between France and Spain. It was classified at the end of the 18th century by Antonio Jose Cavanilles of the Univeristy of Madrid.
Lore:
The genus was named from the Greek for the crane because the seed pod resembles the long beak of that bird.