• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Average Landscape Size
    Fast growing 30 to 40 ft. tall, 20 to 30 ft. wide.
    Key Feature:
    Key Feature
    Year-round Interest
    Blooms:
    Flowering Time
    Does not flower
    Landscape Uses:
    Landscape Uses
  • Detail
    Plant type:Conifer
    Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
    Sunset climate zones:4 - 9, 14 - 24
    Growth habit:Columnar
    Growth rate:Fast
    Average landscape size:Fast growing 30 to 40 ft. tall, 20 to 30 ft. wide.
    Foliage color:Blue-green
    Blooms:Does not flower
    Garden styleAsian/Zen
    Design IdeasA semi-formal single specimen or plant in groves or woodland. Excellent background for contrasting seasonal accent trees. Suited to linear plantings for windbreak or screening.
    Companion PlantsPlant with ground dwelling Gold Stripe Flax Lily, (Dianella tasmanica 'Yellow Stripe'), Lemon Leaf, (Gaultheria sahallon), Purple Gem Rhododendron, (Rhododendron x 'Purple Gem') and Cinnamon Fern, (Osmunda cinnamomea).
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Watering can be reduced after establishment. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This evergreen conifer is classified in the Taxodiaceae with the bald cypress and redwoods of North America. This native of Japan and China was officially introduced to the west in 1842 and classified by Scots botanist David Don.
    Lore:
    The similarity of this Asian tree to Sequoiadendron gigantium of California has led many botanists to believe they are closely related despite separation of continents by the Pacific, leading many to conclude they once inhabited the same primordial land m