• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Moderate to slow growing to 20 to 30 ft. high, 25 to 35 ft. wide.
    Key Feature:
    Year-round Interest
    Blooms:
    Late summer
    Landscape Uses:
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:kol-ru-TEE-ri-a bi-pin-NA-ta
    Plant type:Tree
    Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
    Sunset climate zones:8 - 24
    Growth habit:Spreading
    Growth rate:Moderate
    Average landscape size:Moderate to slow growing to 20 to 30 ft. high, 25 to 35 ft. wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Late summer
    Flower color:Yellow
    Flower attributesFragrant, Showy Flowers
    Design IdeasThis is a highly recommended shade tree for its tidy habit and well-behaved root system. Its deep, non-invasive roots make it an approved street tree in many cities. Plant in narrow parkways and near patios. A good tree to plant under.
    Companion PlantsTry grouping this tree with others of interesting color and texture in warmer winter climates. Great matches are Golden Deodar Cedar (Cedrus deodara 'Aurea') and Krauter's Vesivius Purple Leaf Plum (Prunus cerasifera 'Krauter's Vesuvius'). Plant with large evergreen shrubs that also bear unique coloring such as Shiny Xylosma (Xylosma congestum), Fraser's Photinia (Photinia x fraseri) and Pink Abelia (Abelia x 'Edward Goucher').
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Watering can be reduced after establishment. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.Pruning time: winter.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This tree is native to China but also extensively naturalized in Japan. It's discovery is credited to Jesuit missionary , Pierre d'Incarville, who collected the first seed in China and sent it was with a Russian caravan in 1747. Naturally it was classified by the Russian botanist Erich Laxmann who named it for a contemporary, Joseph Koelreuter, a professor of natural history at Karlsrube. From there plants were sent to Jardin des Plantes and by 1753 were grown elsewhere in Europe, but was not established in America until 1811.