Provided for consumer information—Monrovia is not currently growing this plant.

Light Needs:
Light needs: Full Shade
Full to partial shade
Watering Needs:
Water needs: High
Needs wet or constantly moist soil.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Fast growing, flower spikes to 3 ft. tall, foliage to 3 to 5 ft. tall and wide.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Woodland Garden
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Summer
Botanical Pronunciation:rod-JAIR-zee-ah es-KU-li-fo-li-ah
Plant type:Perennial
Deciduous/evergreen:Herbaceous
Sunset climate zones:2 - 9, 14 - 17
Growth rate:Fast
Average landscape size:Fast growing, flower spikes to 3 ft. tall, foliage to 3 to 5 ft. tall and wide.
Foliage color:Green
Blooms:Summer
Flower color:White
Garden styleAsian/Zen, Cottage, Rustic
Design IdeasGood for use at the edge of continually wet areas. Great for creating the look of natural wetlands or bogs. Works well near streams, water features and pools. Its striking foliage, divided like a horse-chestnut leaf, is as eye-catching as its spikes of white blooms.
Companion PlantsPlant with other water-lovers such as Golden Variegated Sweet Flag (Acorus gramineus 'Ogon') and Miniature Cattail (Typhina minima). On the drier side, but still needing consistent moisture, use Inshriach Pink Astilbe (Astilbe x simplicifolia 'Inshriach Pink') or other astilbe.
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. For a neat appearance, remove old foliage before new leaves emerge. Divide clumps every 2 to 3 years in early spring.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Full Shade
Full to partial shade
Watering Needs:
Water needs: High
Needs wet or constantly moist soil.
History:
This plant falls into the Saxifragaceae family. This genus was classified by Asa Gray, 1810-1888, professor of botany at Harvard and author of Botany of Northern United States and a number of other works on American flora. The genus contains just five species native to eastern Asia and closely related to the more familiar Astilbe clan. This species name describes the similarity of this plant's leaves to that of the common horse chestnut, Aesculus carnea. It is native to China and was introduced to the west via Russian botanist Alexander Batalin, 1847-1898, likely in conjunction with the botanic garden of St. Petersburg.