Provided for consumer information—Monrovia is not currently growing this plant.

Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Moderate growing to 4 to 12 ft. tall and wide.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Ornamental Berries
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Inconspicuous
Plant type:Shrub
Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
Growth habit:Round
Growth rate:Moderate
Average landscape size:Moderate growing to 4 to 12 ft. tall and wide.
Foliage color:Green
Blooms:Inconspicuous
Flower color:White
Garden styleRustic
Design IdeasA colorful native shrub for wild and habitat gardens. Exceptional off season color for water conservative landscape. Perfect for cabins and rural sites as well as expansive suburban grounds. May be used as a screen for privacy or to block views of unsightly land uses. Vital to the winter or holiday decorator's garden and flower arrangers too.
Companion PlantsCombine with other natives such as Autumn Brilliance Apple Serviceberry, (Amelanchier x grandiflora 'Autumn Brilliance'), Eastern Redbud, (Cercis canadensis), Cherokee Sweetgum, (Liquidambar styraciflua 'Ward') and Big Bluestem, (Andropogon gerardii).
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring. For a tidy, neat appearance, shear to shape in early spring.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
History:
This native shrub or small tree is native to a huge range of North America from central states to the east coast. It is found on poorly drained limestone soils and is a wetland indicator plant. This variety is the result of a branch sport discovered at Otis Warren and Son Nursery, Oklahoma City, OK.
Lore:
Birds, deer and of course, opossums are attracted to the fruit.