Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Moderate grower to 6 ft. tall, 4 ft. wide.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Spring Flowering
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Late spring
Botanical Pronunciation:az-ZAY-lee-uh
Plant type:Shrub, Rhododendron
Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
Growth habit:Round
Growth rate:Moderate
Average landscape size:Moderate grower to 6 ft. tall, 4 ft. wide.
Foliage color:Green
Blooms:Late spring
Flower color:Yellow
Flower attributesFragrant, Showy Flowers
Garden styleAsian/Zen
Design IdeasExceptional early spring color for beds, borders and foundation planting. Add to perimeter plantings. A natural large tree groves and the verges of wildlands or naturalistic landscapes. A traditional choice for Asian inspired gardens. Bold color for reflecting pools and water gardens.
Companion PlantsGroup this azalea with other very cold hardy plants such as Pocahontas Canadian Lilac, (Syringa x hyacinthiflora 'Pocahontas'), Eastern Snowball, (Viburnum opulus 'Sterile'), Ivory Halo Dogwood, (Cornus alba 'Bailhalo') and Pamela Jackman Alpine Clematis, (Clematis alpina 'Pamela Jackman').
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Provide well drained soil, rich in organic matter. Feed with an acid fertilizer after bloom. Keep roots cool with a thick layer of mulch.Pruning time: spring after flowering.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
History:
The Northern Lights azaleas were developed by the University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, bred for their extreme cold hardiness. The program developed its first commercially available seedlings in 1978 resulting from the original cross of R. prinophyllum and R. x kosteranum. The former species is an American species found from Main south to Virginia and west to Missouri. Golden Lights was developed from R. prinophyllum and a white flowered Exbury hybrid.
Lore:
Though these plants are typically listed as a genus azalea, there is no official genus by that name. They are all technically species and hybrids of genus Rhododendron.