• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Partial to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water regularly in extreme heat for best performance. Requires less water once established.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Slow-growing rounded form to 6 to 8 ft. tall, 8 to 10 ft. wide.
    Key Feature:
    Easy Care Plant
    Blooms:
    Insignificant flowers
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:TAKS-us x MEE-di-a
    Plant type:Conifer
    Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
    Growth habit:Round
    Growth rate:Slow
    Average landscape size:Slow-growing rounded form to 6 to 8 ft. tall, 8 to 10 ft. wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Insignificant flowers
    Design IdeasA slow-growing evergreen that is perfect for a formal or informal hedge, as it does not need shearing as often as other hedge plants. Use it as a backdrop for colorful shrub and perennial companions.
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring. For a tidy, neat appearance, shear annually to shape.Pruning time: fall.
    Light Needs:
    <strong>Partial Sun / Partial Shade</strong>: These two terms are often used interchangeably to mean 3-6 (or 4-6) hours of sunlight each day. However, there is a difference.
<strong>Partial shade</strong> typically means the plants will appreciate a more gentle exposure such as the weaker morning or early afternoon sun, with the emphasis on providing the minimum needed shade and sheltering from intense late afternoon sun. <strong>Partial sun</strong> typically means the plants <u>need</u> some direct sun, so the emphasis is on meeting the required minimum hours of sunlight, with filtered sunlight or shade the balance of the day.
Both are best with shelter from the harshest late afternoon sun. This shade could be provided by a structure, a wall, larger plants or  tree(s).
    Partial to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Water regularly in extreme heat for best performance. Requires less water once established.
  • History & Lore
    Lore:
    All species of this genus are poisonous. One American species is the source of the cancer drug, Taxol. In England yew trees were restricted to church yards where they were not subject to livestock grazing, which caused many animal deaths in the past. Interestingly, deer may graze on them, unaffected. Birds are also attracted to the fruit, which they eat without consequence, as the flesh is not toxic to most, and the seed passes through intact.