Provided for consumer information—Monrovia is not currently growing this plant.

  • Overview
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Average Landscape Size
    Moderately fast-growing to 40 to 50 ft. high, 50 to 60 ft. wide.
    Key Feature:
    Key Feature
    Year-round Interest
    Blooms:
    Flowering Time
    Inconspicuous
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:ULL-mus par-vi-FOH-li-a
    Plant type:Tree
    Deciduous/evergreen:Semi-evergreen
    Growth habit:Weeping
    Growth rate:Moderate
    Average landscape size:Moderately fast-growing to 40 to 50 ft. high, 50 to 60 ft. wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Inconspicuous
    Flower color:Red
    Design IdeasThe interesting spreading and weeping form of this tree makes it a fine choice of shade tree for the lawn or patio. It is a tough and beautiful tree that is tolerant of urban conditions.
    Companion PlantsPair this tree with an arbor or fence covered in Tangerine Beauty Cross Vine (Bignonia capreolata 'Tangerine Beauty'). A hedge of Compact Texas Sage (Leucophyllum frutescens 'Compactum') is a striking companion with its pink flowers. The mounding form of Miss Huff Hardy Lantana (Lantana camara 'Miss Huff') mirrors the tree's form, and also offers pink and orange flowers.
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Watering can be reduced after establishment. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.Pruning time: late winter or early spring.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This species is native to China and Japan and was classified by Austrian botanist, Nicolaus Jacquin. It's early introduction to the west in 1794 suggests it was likely collected by the Jesuit d'Incarville and sent to France overland through the botanic garden at St. Petersburg.
    Lore:
    Chinese elm has been a common replacement tree for the American elms destroyed by killer Dutch elm disease that has decimated the street trees of most older neighborhoods.