• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Partial Sun
    Partial to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Average Landscape Size
    Moderate grower to 10 to 12 ft. tall and wide.
    Key Feature:
    Key Feature
    Hedge Plant
    Blooms:
    Flowering Time
    Inconspicuous
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:zi-LOS-ma kon-GES-tum
    Plant type:Shrub
    Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
    Growth habit:Spreading
    Growth rate:Moderate
    Average landscape size:Moderate grower to 10 to 12 ft. tall and wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Inconspicuous
    Garden styleContemporary
    Design IdeasXylosma can be used as either a shrub or small tree in the landscape. Makes a fine natural hedge gently pruned to size or it will adapt to mild shearing for a more formal appearance. Allow it to grow naturally for a shiny light green background for beds and borders. Excellent for breaking up long fence lines or for de-emphasizing large multistory walls in foundation planting.
    Companion PlantsEvergreen xylosma belongs with bright warm climate bloomers such as Rainbow Knock Out Rose, (Rosa x 'Radcor'), Lavender Lady Passionflower, (Passiflora x 'Lavender Lady'), Patriot Rainbow Compact Lantana, (Lantana camara 'Robpatrai') and Catawba Crepe Myrtle, (Lagerstroemia indica 'Catawba').
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring. For a tidy, neat appearance, shear annually to shape.Pruning time: spring.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Partial Sun
    Partial to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This genus contains about one hundred species of evergreens found everywhere in the tropics and subtropics except Africa. The plant was discovered in China by Portuguese Jesuit missionary Juan Louriero, 1715-1796 whose descriptions reached Dutch botanist Friedrich Miquel. However, the final classification was made by English botanists at Kew Gardens or via the London Horticultural Society.
    Lore:
    When in bloom, xylosmas draw bees in droves which makes this shrub vital in wildlife gardens and an undesirable plant near swimming pools.