• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Partial Sun
    Partial to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Average Landscape Size
    Slow-growing rounded shrub to 3 to 4 ft. tall, spreading wider.
    Key Feature:
    Key Feature
    Year-round Interest
    Blooms:
    Flowering Time
    Spring
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:foth-er-GIL-a gar-DE-ne-i
    Plant type:Shrub
    Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
    Sunset climate zones:2 - 9, 14 - 17
    Growth habit:Round
    Growth rate:Slow
    Average landscape size:Slow-growing rounded shrub to 3 to 4 ft. tall, spreading wider.
    Foliage color:Blue-green
    Blooms:Spring
    Flower color:White
    Flower attributesFragrant, Showy Flowers
    Garden styleCottage
    Design IdeasPlant this lovely native in shade gardens or in woodland garden settings where its rangy character and white flower spikes are appreciated. Use as a single specimen for accent planting or mix into casual shrub borders or with other natives that need a color boost in spring or fall.
    Companion PlantsThis native shrub belongs beneath forest trees, both conifers and hardwoods, where Rhododendron hybrids like Anna H. Hall (Rhododendron x 'Anna H. Hall') and Roseum Elegans (Rhododendron x 'Roseum Elegans') thrive. It's related to Witch Hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) and shares the same requirements as native Strawberry Bush (Euonymus americanus) and Alaskan Fern (Polystichum setiferum).
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Watering can be reduced after establishment. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.Pruning time: winter.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Partial Sun
    Partial to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This American native is grouped in the witchhazel family. Its natural range is limited to isolated stands over the southeast from North Carolina to southern Alabama. Plants exist only in low lying damp wetlands. It was classified in 1765 by German botanist Johann Murray as one of three species in this genus. Linnaeus named the plant after a contemporary, John Fothergill, the English physician who introduced this and many other American natives to Europe.