• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Partial Sun
    Partial sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Low
    Once established, needs only occasional watering.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Average Landscape Size
    Fast growing 14 to 18 inches tall and wide.
    Key Feature:
    Key Feature
    Easy Care Plant
    Blooms:
    Flowering Time
    Summer
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:lir-RYE-oh-pee mus-KAR-ee
    Deciduous/evergreen:Herbaceous
    Growth rate:Fast
    Average landscape size:Fast growing 14 to 18 inches tall and wide.
    Foliage color:Dark Green
    Blooms:Summer
    Flower color:White
    Flower attributesShowy Flowers
    Garden styleAsian/Zen, Contemporary
    Design IdeasLiriopes are exceptional shade garden edging or front of the border line. Plant in masses under shade trees or large old shrubs with bare legs to discourage weeds and cover bare ground. Popular with boulders and along stepping walks in Asian inspired gardens. Equally good in rock waterfall and woodland settings.
    Companion PlantsBounce this foliage off Golden Japanese Gorest Grass, (Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola'), Variegated Japanese Sedge, (Carex morrowii 'Aureo-variegata'). Beautiful with Imperial Queen Azalea, (Azalea 'Monal') or Valley Rose Pieris, (Pieris japonica 'Valley Rose').
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. For a neat appearance, remove old foliage before new leaves emerge. Divide clumps every 2 to 3 years in early spring.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Partial Sun
    Partial sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Low
    Once established, needs only occasional watering.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This genus was classified in the 18th century by Portuguese Jesuit Loureiro in China. He named the genus after mythological nymph, Liriope. Not until the 20th century did L.H. Bailey assign the species there. Early on Liriopes were grouped with the Ophiopogons and known as maidong in their land of origin.
    Lore:
    In ancient China where paper was an expensive commodity, leaves of this plant were used as bookmarks and thus often found growing at educational institutions and libraries.