• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Partial shade to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Grows to 12-18 in. tall and 18-24 in. wide.
    Key Feature:
    Ornamental Berries
    Blooms:
    Pink summer flowers; purple berries ripen in fall
  • Detail
    Plant type:Groundcover, Shrub
    Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
    Growth habit:Spreading
    Growth rate:Moderate
    Average landscape size:Grows to 12-18 in. tall and 18-24 in. wide.
    Blooms:Pink summer flowers; purple berries ripen in fall
    Flower color:Pink
    Garden styleContemporary, Rustic
    Patent Act:Asexual reproduction of plants protected by the Plant Patent Act is prohibited during the life of the patent.
  • Care
    Care Information
    Provide well drained soil. Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Fertilize before new growth begins in spring. Prune to 1 ft. from ground in late winter or early spring.
    Light Needs:
    <strong>Partial Sun / Partial Shade</strong>: These two terms are often used interchangeably to mean 3-6 (or 4-6) hours of sunlight each day. However, there is a difference.
<strong>Partial shade</strong> typically means the plants will appreciate a more gentle exposure such as the weaker morning or early afternoon sun, with the emphasis on providing the minimum needed shade and sheltering from intense late afternoon sun. <strong>Partial sun</strong> typically means the plants <u>need</u> some direct sun, so the emphasis is on meeting the required minimum hours of sunlight, with filtered sunlight or shade the balance of the day.
Both are best with shelter from the harshest late afternoon sun. This shade could be provided by a structure, a wall, larger plants or  tree(s).
    Partial shade to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    Symphoricarpos are native to North America and were first improved by the breeding work of G.A. Doorenbos in the 1940's. The native habitat runs from Nova Scotia to Alberta, south to Minnesota and Virginia and in the western North America from Southwestern Alaska to Southern California. Snowberry is a member of the Honeysuckle family and got its name from the inside of the fruit which looks like snow when broken open. Virtually all Native American tribes within its range used this plant as a medicinal for treating a wide variety of illnesses from upset stomach to eye inflammation. It is warned that ingestion of the berries could cause mild illness and is not advised.