• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Full shade to partial sun
    Watering Needs:
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Moderate growing; reaches 2 to 3 ft. tall, 3 ft. wide.
    Key Feature:
    Showy Repeat Bloomer
    Blooms:
    Blooms in spring, repeating in late summer.
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:az-ZAY-lee-uh
    Plant type:Shrub, Rhododendron
    Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
    Growth habit:Compact, Round
    Growth rate:Moderate
    Average landscape size:Moderate growing; reaches 2 to 3 ft. tall, 3 ft. wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Blooms in spring, repeating in late summer.
    Flower color:Purple
    Garden styleAsian/Zen, Cottage
    Patent Act:Asexual reproduction of plants protected by the Plant Patent Act is prohibited during the life of the patent.
    Companion PlantsJapanese Maple (Acer); Lily of the Valley Shrub (Pieris); Fern (Woodwardia); Astilbe (Astilbe); Camellia (Camellia); Bleeding Heart (Dicentra)
  • Care
    Care Information
    Provide well-drained, acidic soil, rich in organic matter. Apply a thick layer of mulch to keep roots cool, avoiding the crown. Protect from harsh afternoon sun. Follow a regular schedule of deep waterings during the first growing season to establish an extensive root system. Feed with an acid fertilizer after bloom.Pruning time: spring after flowering.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Shade
    Full shade to partial sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This new cultivar originated from a planned breeding program conducted by Robert Head and Lisa Jones Head in Long Creek, Oconee County, S.C. The objective of the breeding program is to create new compact evergreen Azalea plants having dense growth habit, large attractive flowers, flowers with good temperature tolerance, consistent remontant flowering during the spring, summer and autumn, good garden performance in high and low temperatures. The new plant originated from a cross-pollination made in 1996, of Rhododendron hybrida 'Robin Hill Congo', not patented, as the female, or seed, parent with a proprietary selection of Rhododendron hybrida identified as code number RLH-1600-AC, not patented, as the male, or pollen, parent. The new Azalea plant was discovered and selected as a single flowering plant within the progeny in a controlled greenhouse environment in Long Creek, Oconee County, S.C. in 2000.
    Lore:
    Though they are widely known as azaleas, azaleas are actually a specialized group of plants under the genus Rhododendron.