Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Low
Once established, needs only occasional watering.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Grows to 2 1/2 ft. tall by 3 1/2 ft. wide.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Dwarf Habit
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Spring
Landscape Uses:
Landscape Uses
Plant type:Shrub
Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
Growth habit:Compact
Growth rate:Moderate
Average landscape size:Grows to 2 1/2 ft. tall by 3 1/2 ft. wide.
Foliage color:Dark Green
Blooms:Spring
Flower color:Pink
Garden styleMediterranean
Patent Act:Asexual reproduction of plants protected by the Plant Patent Act is prohibited during the life of the patent.
Design IdeasAn outstanding performer that offers multi-season interest for smallish homes. Choice grouped into foundation planting. Short stature is perfect beneath large picture windows. Use in mixed borders as singles or grouped for larger color splash. Line up into informal hedge or edging along pavement. Plant along the base of picket fences or to cloak seatwall footings. Well behaved choice for raised planters.
Companion PlantsPlant with French Lavender, (Lavandula dentata candicans), Compact Strawberry Bush, (Arbutus unedo 'Compacta'), Brown Eyed Rockrose, (Cistus ladanifer maculata), Watermelon Red Crepe Myrtle, (Lagerstroemia indica 'Watermelon Red'), Trumpet Honeysuckle, (Lonicera sempervirens 'Magnifica') and Carolina Jessamine, (Gelsemium sempervirens).
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Low
Once established, needs only occasional watering.
History:
Indian hawthorn cultivars link back to one primary species, Raphiolepis indica, a native of southern China and Indonesia. It's native habitat is hillsides from sea level to four thousand feet in elevation. Of the six wild species only two are in cludinvation. The genus was named by John Lindley, among th emost influential directions of the Royal Horticultural Society. It's common name, hawthorne is a misnomer as it was originally grouped with true hawthornes in their genus Crataegus. Though common in the wild in Asia, they were never garden plants there.
Lore:
Entomosporium leaf spot fungus has plagued Indian Hawthorn in the southern United States. Dr. Will Corley's efforts to breed fungus resistant varieties at the University of Georgia has yielded 'Georgia Petite'. It is derived from R. delacourii, itself a hybrid of R. indica and R. umbellata bred decades ago by M. Delacour at Cannes, France.