• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Full to partial shade
    Watering Needs:
    Water regularly to maintain evenly moist soil - weekly, or more.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Moderate to slow growth; forms mat 10 in. tall, 24 to 36 in. wide.
    Key Feature:
    Cold-Hardy Groundcover
    Blooms:
    Summer
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:gol-THEER-ee-uh pro-KUM-benz
    Plant type:Groundcover, Shrub
    Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
    Growth habit:Spreading
    Growth rate:Moderate
    Average landscape size:Moderate to slow growth; forms mat 10 in. tall, 24 to 36 in. wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Summer
    Flower color:White
    Garden styleAsian/Zen, Cottage
    Patent Act:Asexual reproduction of plants protected by the Plant Patent Act is prohibited during the life of the patent.
    Design IdeasA northern garden problem solver for semi-shaded areas. Perfect spreader for ground beneath conifers and hardwood tree groves. Makes good greenery on shaded exposures of foundation planting. Does well in and around naturalistic water features where soils are sandy and well-drained. Thrives on banks and slopes protected by forest canopy. Great for naturalizing in wild gardens.
    Companion PlantsLily of the Valley (Pieris); Snowberry (Symphoricarpos); Dogwood (Cornus); Rhododendron (Rhododendron);Oregon Grape Holly (Mahonia)
  • Care
    Care Information
    Provide organically rich, well-drained soil. Best in partial shade, but tolerates full shade. Protect roots with a thick layer of mulch. Water deeply and regularly during the first growing season to establish an extensive root system; once established, water regularly to maintain evenly moist soil. Feed with an acid fertilizer after bloom.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Shade
    Full to partial shade
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: High
    Water regularly to maintain evenly moist soil - weekly, or more.
  • History & Lore
    Lore:
    Related to the magnolias, this northern woodland species is native to a wide range of boreal habitats from Alaska to Newfoundland. Gaultheria was named as the source of medicinal wintergreen oil, and contains the same painkilling elements as aspirin. It was commonly used by Native Americans within its range as a tea.