Light Needs:
Light needs: Full Sun
Full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Low
Once established, needs only occasional watering.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Moderate growing to 35 to 45 ft. tall, 25 to 35 ft. wide.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Fall Color
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Inconspicuous
Botanical Pronunciation:kar-PY-nus BET-ew-lus
Plant type:Tree
Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
Sunset climate zones:2 - 9, 14 - 17
Growth habit:Pyramidal
Growth rate:Moderate
Average landscape size:Moderate growing to 35 to 45 ft. tall, 25 to 35 ft. wide.
Foliage color:Dark Green
Blooms:Inconspicuous
Flower color:Yellow
Design IdeasWell proven tree for boulevards, parks and institutional landscapes. Nice shade tree for narrow suburban yards and for visually dividing closely placed multistory homes. The favorite form for allees and pleached effects in the European style. In a windrow, hornbeam makes a fine large scale visual screen or windbreak.
Companion PlantsGreat with evergreen Oriental Spruce, (Picea orientalis 'Atrovirens') and Austrian Pine, (Pinus nigra). Exceptional color companions include Autumn Gold Maidenhair, (Ginkgo biloba 'Autumn Gold') and River's Purple European Beech, (Fagus sylvatica 'Riversii').
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Watering can be reduced after establishment. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.Pruning time: winter.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Full Sun
Full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Low
Once established, needs only occasional watering.
History:
The European hornbeam is native to Europe eastward to central Asia. It has been in cultivation for so long there is no date of introduction. It was introduced into North America during colonial times. This fastigiate form was introduced in 1883.
Lore:
Hornbeam is a favorite tree for the art of pleaching, which is a form of topiary on a monstrous scale. This species withstands frequent shearing and is often planted into allees in Britain.