• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Partial Sun
    Partial to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Average Landscape Size
    Moderate growth to 25 ft. tall and wide.
    Key Feature:
    Key Feature
    Spring Flowering
    Blooms:
    Flowering Time
    Early summer
    Landscape Uses:
    Landscape Uses
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:KOR-nus
    Plant type:Tree
    Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
    Sunset climate zones:3 - 9, 14 - 17
    Growth habit:Pyramidal
    Growth rate:Moderate
    Average landscape size:Moderate growth to 25 ft. tall and wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Early summer
    Flower color:White
    Flower attributesShowy Flowers
    Patent Act:Asexual reproduction of plants protected by the Plant Patent Act is prohibited during the life of the patent.
    Design IdeasA spectacular accent tree for high profile front yards in the lawn or in beds with more diverse planting. Makes a stellar focal point in backyard landscape and it will draw the eye wherever it grows. Plant aligned with picture windows or sliding glass doors to better enjoy its seasonal changes from indoors. Good accent for shading and interest close to patio or terrace. Outstanding beneath a canopy of old shade trees or set into a woodland composition with understory species native or exotic. A valuable disease resistant replacement for dying Cornus florida and other susceptible dogwoods.
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Watering can be reduced after establishment. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.Pruning time: winter.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Partial Sun
    Partial to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    In the late 20th century a disease struck Cornus florida both in cultivation and in the wild causing the death of millions of trees in North American. Breeding efforts by Dr. Elwin Orton of Rutgers University resulted in the Rutgers Stellar Series dogwoods considered highly resistant to dogwood borer and moderately to highly resistant to dogwood anthracnose. The trees are a cross between C. florida, a native of the American southeastern states and C. kousa, the Japanese dogwood. The Stellar series blooms slightly later and lacks fruit.
    Lore:
    Native Americans used the bloom time of the dogwoods to signal time to plant corn. Dogwood bark is notorously hard and used to make high stress tools.