• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Fast growing to 15 to 20 in. tall, 1 ft. wide.
    Key Feature:
    Cottage Garden Plant
    Blooms:
    Late spring through summer
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:ko-re-OP-sis
    Plant type:Perennial
    Deciduous/evergreen:Herbaceous
    Sunset climate zones:2 - 24
    Growth rate:Fast
    Average landscape size:Fast growing to 15 to 20 in. tall, 1 ft. wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Late spring through summer
    Flower color:Yellow
    Garden styleCottage, Rustic
    Design IdeasThis is among the plants that change character with their surroundings. An outstanding cottage garden plant with casual sprawling character. Equally useful for sunny looks in more highbrow borders and rose beds. Line paths and walks with yellow daisies. Fill in sparse planters and add seasonal interest in evergreen compositions. An American native suited to wild, wildlife and indigenous plant gardens.
    Companion PlantsCombine this perennial with Fanfare Blanket Flower, (Gaillardia x 'Fanfare'), Pixie Meadowbrite Coneflower, (Echinacea 'CBG Cone 2'), Sweet Dreams Tickseed, (Coreopsis rosa 'Sweet Dreams') and Becky Shasta Daisy, (Chrysanthemum x superbum 'Becky').
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. For a neat appearance, remove old foliage before new leaves emerge. Divide clumps every 2 to 3 years in early spring.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This large genus includes over one hundred species native to the Americas, tropical Africa and Hawaii. This plant is a hybrid of C. lanceolata, is a native wildflower of the southeastern United States.
    Lore:
    Coreopsis is a name translated from the Greek for 'bug like' due to the resemblance of the seed to wood ticks.