• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Moderate growing to 15 to 20 ft tall, 10 to 12 wide. Smaller as a container plant.
    Key Feature:
    Edible
    Blooms:
    Early spring
    Landscape Uses:
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:SIT-rus si-NEN-sis
    Plant type:Citrus
    Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
    Growth habit:Rounded
    Growth rate:Moderate
    Average landscape size:Moderate growing to 15 to 20 ft tall, 10 to 12 wide. Smaller as a container plant.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Early spring
    Flower color:White
    Flower attributesFragrant
    Garden styleMediterranean, Tropical
    Design IdeasWith its glossy, dark evergreen foliage, this Citrus lends itself to growing in the sun in a large terra cotta pot--a classic Mediterranean look. Or plant one on each side of the doorway in ground or in pots for an instant frame. Grow in fruit or kitchen garden for ideal irrigation and soil care, or plant to break up a long fence line with foliage, scented flowers and fruit.
    Companion PlantsAccent the lightly variegated foliage of this small tree with Bush Mallow, (Lavatera maritima) and pure white blooms of Bridal VeilTM Tropical Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis Bridal VeilTM 'Monora'). Create a striking Mediterranean look with Tiny Tower Italian Cypress, (Cupressus sempervirens 'Monshel') and Hazel Spanish Lavender, (Lavandula stoechas 'Hazel').
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Watering can be reduced after establishment. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    The first navel orange was imported into the U.S. in 1873 from Brazil. There it was developed by crossing C. sinensis with x Citroncirus webberi, a seedling of an earlier cross of the orange and true citron. The first American named navel was 'Washington' and most other cultivars were discovered as sports of this original form.
    Lore:
    The genus citrus is native to Asia and was first brought west to Africa in ancient times, then to Spain and finally to the New World.