• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Slow growing; reaches 2 to 4 in. tall, up to 12 in wide.
    Key Feature:
    Rock Garden Plant
    Blooms:
    Summer into Fall
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:an-DROS-a-kee lah-noo-gi-NO-sa
    Plant type:Perennial
    Deciduous/evergreen:Herbaceous
    Sunset climate zones:1 - 6, 14 - 17
    Growth habit:Spreading
    Growth rate:Slow
    Average landscape size:Slow growing; reaches 2 to 4 in. tall, up to 12 in wide.
    Foliage color:Gray-green
    Blooms:Summer into Fall
    Flower color:White
    Flower attributesFragrant, Showy Flowers
    Design IdeasAn alpine perennial that thrives wherever soils are well drained and climate is suitable. Ideal rock garden plant. Grows well niched into dry stone walls and planting pockets of rocky outcroppings where the root zone is high and dry. Grows well in banks and slopes and will cascade over low curbs. Will adapt to low wide well drained pots and troughs.
    Companion PlantsGrow this with Samobor Cranesbill, (Geranium phaeum 'Samobor') ,Emerald Blue Creeping Phlox, (Phlox subulata 'Emerald Blue'), East Friesland Meadow Sage, (Salvia nemorosa 'East Friesland') and Little Spire Russian Sage, (Perovskia atriplicifolia'Little Spire').
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. For a neat appearance, remove old foliage before new leaves emerge. Divide clumps every 2 to 3 years in early spring.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This plant is grouped into the Primrose family, the genus containing about 125 species of herbaceous plants spread throughout Europe, Asia and North America. This species originates in the Himalayan Mountains, most likely Tibet. It was classified by Nathaniel Wallicyh, the Dane who wrote extensively on plants of India and Asia in the early 19th century.