• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Average Landscape Size
    Slow grower to 25 ft. tall, 3 to 4 ft. wide or wider.
    Key Feature:
    Key Feature
    Deer Resistant
    Blooms:
    Flowering Time
    Does not flower
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:se-kwoy-a-DEN-dron gi-gan-TEE-um
    Plant type:Conifer
    Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
    Sunset climate zones:1 - 9, 14 - 23
    Growth habit:Narrow, Weeping
    Growth rate:Slow
    Average landscape size:Slow grower to 25 ft. tall, 3 to 4 ft. wide or wider.
    Special features:Deer Resistant
    Foliage color:Gray-green
    Blooms:Does not flower
    Design IdeasA larger more lush alternative to the weeping atlas cedar with much more amenable climate tolerance. A stupendous single specimen as a focal point in front yard or back. Exceptional in conjunction with natural water features and reflecting pools. Choice selection for Japanese gardens and in a naturalistic woodland setting.
    Companion PlantsContrast the weeping form with the swordlike foliage of Bronze New Zealand Flax (Phormium tenax 'Atropurpureum Compactum') or a grassy element such as the Fountain Grass (Pennisetum alopecuroides 'Hameln'). A grouping of the extremely columnar Skyrocket Juniper (Juniperus virginiana 'Skyrocket') also makes a good upright statement.
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Watering can be reduced after establishment. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    Considered the most massive tree in the world yet it occurrs in just a few isolated groves on the west slope of California's Sierra Nevada Mountains at elevations from 4000 to 8000 feet. It is grouped with cousins the coast and dawn redwoods in the Taxodiaceae or cypress family. It was finally classified by John Buchholz, noted 20th century authority on conifers and professor of botany at Illinois. This weeping form is a nursery selection.