Light Needs:
Light needs: Full Shade
Full to partial shade
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Creates a mat 6 in. tall, spreading 2 to 3 ft.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Shade Loving
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Spring
Botanical Pronunciation:VING-ka MI-nor
Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
Growth rate:Moderate
Average landscape size:Creates a mat 6 in. tall, spreading 2 to 3 ft.
Special features:Deer Resistant, Dwarf Plant
Foliage color:Green
Blooms:Spring
Flower color:Purple
Flower attributesShowy Flowers
Garden styleCottage, Mediterranean
Design IdeasThe luxurious trailing form of this evergreen vine looks fabulous hanging over a low wall or edge of a container. Makes a vigorous groundcover for sheltered locations beneath tree canopies and banks where it will force out weeds. Capable of weaving itself through rocky outcroppings and for covering up mortar at rock waterfalls or pools. Truly romantic addition to sparse old shrub borders and north side foundation planting.
Companion PlantsThe white plumes of Deutschland Astilbe (Astilbe x arendsii 'Deutschland') bring light to this combination. Ferns are a good component of this planting, including Crested Lady Fern (Athyrium filix femina 'Cristatum'). Let Pink Anemone Clematis (Clematis montana rubens) cool its roots in this shade and climb up an arbor into the sun.
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. As a groundcover, space plants 5 ft. apart, (closer for faster coverage). Control weeds with mulch until the plants cover the area.Pruning time: early spring.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Full Shade
Full to partial shade
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
History:
This plant falls into the Apocynaceae. The genus was named from the Latin vernacular for the plant. Genus vinca contains about 12 species of trailing plants all native to the Old World. Also known as running myrtle, the plants are associated with Roman garlands and were spread with the empire. In some warmer regions of the U.S. this plant has naturalized and may be considered invasive.
Lore:
During the middle ages it was worn by the condemned on their way to execution.