• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Partial Sun
    Partial sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Water regularly, when top 3 in. of soil is dry.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Average Landscape Size
    Grows to 10 inches high, spreads 15 to 18 in. wide.
    Key Feature:
    Key Feature
    Shade Loving
    Blooms:
    Flowering Time
    Late summer
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:lir-EYE-oh-pee spi-CAH-ta
    Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
    Growth rate:Moderate
    Average landscape size:Grows to 10 inches high, spreads 15 to 18 in. wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Late summer
    Flower color:Purple
    Design IdeasThis is a super highlight and edging plant for partially shaded beds. The bright variegated leaves also bring a sense of light into darker plantings or woodland gardens. Perfect in a glazed, cobalt-blue Chinese pot set on a porch, steps or pedestal. Works well in natural drifts or planted next to boulders and rock waterfalls. A reliable and attractive alternative to more invasive ornamental Grass or dwarf Bamboo.
    Companion PlantsPair Silver Dragon with large-leafed, shade loving varieties like Heuchera, Elephant Ear and Hydrangea to set off the narrow, grass-like foliage. The silver-white stripe pops with burgundy foliage and colorful blooming plants nearby.
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. For a neat appearance, remove old foliage before new leaves emerge. Divide clumps every 2 to 3 years in early spring.Pruning time: winter.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Partial Sun
    Partial sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Water regularly, when top 3 in. of soil is dry.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    Native to East Asia, this grass-like flowering plant is used in Chinese medicine as a treatment for yin deficiency. There is much debate over the correct pronounciation of Liriope and the use of its common name Lilyturf. In the Southeastern U.S. it is sometimes referred to as Monkey Grass or Spider Grass.