Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Slow grower to 15 to 20 ft. tall, 6 to 8 ft. wide, larger with age.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Deer Resistant
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Does not flower
Botanical Pronunciation:poh-doh-KAR-pus mak-roh-FIL-us
Plant type:Tree
Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
Sunset climate zones:4 - 9, 12 - 24
Growth habit:Pyramidal
Growth rate:Slow
Average landscape size:Slow grower to 15 to 20 ft. tall, 6 to 8 ft. wide, larger with age.
Foliage color:Green
Blooms:Does not flower
Garden styleAsian/Zen, Tropical
Design IdeasWith its dense, upright form, this Podocarpus can become a columnar corner plant. Line them up, with spaces in between, as a repeating element behind traditional perennial borders. Plant as a solid hedge for a manicured privacy screen along property lines and side yards. In warm-winter climates, it makes a great evergreen background that can be shaped to your needs. Excellent choice for front yards needing separation between multistory buildings.
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring. For a tidy, neat appearance, shear annually to shape.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
History:
This is a valuable plant native to Japan and southern China.This genus was conferred by French botanist Charles L'Hertier de Brutelle, 1746-1800, either from specimens provided by Thunberg from Japan or more likely those sent west by French Catholic missionaries in China. The species was described but misclassified by Carl Thunberg in the 18th century as a yew under Taxus macrophylla. It also went by P. longifolia for awhile. Scots botanist David Don, 1799-1841 accurately classified the plants as P. macrophyllus to describe its notably long leaf shape.
Lore:
The tree is grown in China for its religious symbolism related to its appearance which suggests the lohans, followers of Buddha, often depicted on temple walls. Therefore aged specimens of this "lohan pine" tree are frequently found on temple grounds.