Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Fast growing 15-20 ft. tall and wide; maintain at 6-10 ft. with pruning.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Asian Garden
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Spring
Landscape Uses:
Landscape Uses
Botanical Pronunciation:SAY-liks in-te-GRA
Plant type:Shrub
Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
Growth habit:Weeping
Growth rate:Fast
Average landscape size:Fast growing 15-20 ft. tall and wide; maintain at 6-10 ft. with pruning.
Special features:Dramatic Foliage Color
Foliage color:Green
Blooms:Spring
Flower color:Pink
Garden styleAsian/Zen, Contemporary
Design IdeasThis beauty emerges out of the gardens of Japan where it was bred for its unique semiweeping form and singular seasonal changes. It is an understory species of the shade garden, thriving under canopy trees both evergreen and deciduous. Its traditional use is beside streams and water features in Asian gardens where, like most willows, it is tolerant of perennial damp and seepage. The drooping form is considered a fluid accent for natural waterways. Cold hardiness makes these shrubs an ideal candidate for natural woodlands or combined with American natives with similar requirements for more varied early spring interest.
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Watering can be reduced after establishment. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.Pruning time: winter.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
History:
Salix integra is a species native to Japan and Korea, found in low lying areas in conjunction with streams, seeps and marshes. It is often classified among the basket willows as S. purpurea var. multinervis, so very little information is available under the standard species name. It is grouped into the Saliaceae with three hundred other species. This Japanese cultivar was introduced to the west by the great Dutch hosta breeder, Harry Van Der Laar in 1979.
Lore:
The entire clan of genus Salix has always been vital to the ethnobotany of cultures within its range. Long flexible whip-like growth is essential to basket making and the weaving of wattle fences. It is the primary material of early daub and wattle construction. Willow bark can also contain aspirin-like compounds, so these plants are an essential component of materia medica down through the ages, used by housewives and apothecaries alike.