Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Low, mounding foliage 8 to 10 in. tall, 16 in. wide; thin flower stems 28 in. high.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Rock Garden Plant
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Summer
Deciduous/evergreen:Herbaceous
Growth habit:Compact
Growth rate:Moderate
Average landscape size:Low, mounding foliage 8 to 10 in. tall, 16 in. wide; thin flower stems 28 in. high.
Foliage color:Multicolored
Blooms:Summer
Flower color:White
Garden styleCottage
Design IdeasThis variable beauty is excellent in irregular groups even as groundcover mases for woodland understory gardens or beneath shade tree canopies. A great choice for all kinds of naturalistic settings or peeking out from under landscape boulders. In formal gardens position near porch or patio and terrace for close-up view. Excellent for nesting a pedestal or fountain. Even adapts as edging. A valuable plant for containers that offers both foliage and flower accents
Companion PlantsFor contrast group with either Marmalade Coral Bells, (Heuchera x 'Marmalade') or Amber Waves Heuchera, (Heuchera x 'Amber Waves'). Exceptional choice in semishade with Burgundy Lace Painted Fern, (Athyrium nipponicum 'Burgundy Lace'), Gold Fountains Sedge, (Carex dolichostachya 'Kaga Nishiki'), All Gold Japanese Forest Grass, (Hakonechloa macra 'All Gold') and Blackstem Bigleaf Hydrangea, (Hydrangea macrophylla 'Nigra').
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. For a neat appearance, remove old foliage before new leaves emerge. Divide clumps every 2 to 3 years in early spring.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
History:
This native Heuchera is known as rock geranium, alum root and American sanicle. It is found over most of the eastern states from the Canadian border to the Gulf Coast. This cultivar was developed by Terra Nova Nurseries in Oregon.
Lore:
Native Americans used these thick roots for a medicinal by drying and then pounding them into a wound dressing, hence the common name, alum root.