• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water regularly - weekly, or more often in extreme heat or containers.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Moderate growing; reaches 6 to 8 ft. tall, 4 to 5 ft. wide.
    Key Feature:
    Stunning Tropical Flowers
    Blooms:
    Summer; nearly year-round in temperate regions.
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:hi-BIS-kus ro-ZA-si-nen-sis
    Plant type:Shrub
    Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
    Growth habit:Round
    Growth rate:Moderate
    Average landscape size:Moderate growing; reaches 6 to 8 ft. tall, 4 to 5 ft. wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Summer; nearly year-round in temperate regions.
    Flower color:Yellow
    Garden styleTropical
    Design IdeasThis unique, double-ruffled golden Hibiscus is beautiful as a foundation planting along buildings and fence lines. It can be accented with hot-colored flowers and vines for a festive composition. Makes a solid hedge or plant as a specimen at entries and gateways. Most charming when trained into a patio tree and planted in large pots stuffed with annual color.
    Companion PlantsPrincess Flower (Tibouchina); Lantana (Lantana); Fountain Grass (Pennisetum); Mandevilla (Mandevilla); Plumbago (Plumbago)
  • Care
    Care Information
    Thrives in well-drained, enriched soils with neutral to slightly acidic pH. Water deeply and regularly during the first growing season to establish an extensive root system; reduce frequency once established. Apply a general fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.Pruning time: spring.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Water regularly - weekly, or more often in extreme heat or containers.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    The genus Hibiscus contains over 200 species from around the world. It was named from the Latin for rose of China, pointing to its place of origin in southeast Asia where plants were found in the literature as early as 295 BC. All early descriptions indicate the first plants bore red flowers, with the other colors the result of breeding. It was introduced into Europe in 1731
    Lore:
    It was French impressionist painter Paul Gauguin who so often depicted this flower in Tahitian scenes.