• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Once established, needs only occasional watering.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Quickly reaches 5 ft. tall, 4 ft. wide.
    Key Feature:
    Showy Summer Flowers
    Blooms:
    Summer
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:la-ger-STRE-mee-a IN-di-ka
    Plant type:Shrub, Tree
    Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
    Sunset climate zones:7 - 10, 12 - 14, 18 - 21
    Growth rate:Fast
    Average landscape size:Quickly reaches 5 ft. tall, 4 ft. wide.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Summer
    Flower color:Red
    Flower attributesShowy Flowers
    Design IdeasA striking crape myrtle with small shrubby stature that brings the vivid late summer color into beds and borders. Spices up foundation planting perfectly. Plant as a single, in groups to intensify color or in a row for a beautiful blooming hedge. When used next to outdoor living areas the attractive bark may be enjoyed while plants are dormant.
    Companion PlantsIndian Hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis); Daylily (Hemerocallis); Butterfly Bush (Buddleja); Mexican Heather (Cuphea); Chaste Tree (Vitex)
  • Care
    Care Information
    Thrives in average, well-drained soils. Water deeply, regularly during first growing season to establish extensive root system. Feed before new growth begins in spring. Thin young trees in late winter to early spring, leaving 3 to 7 main trunks or canopy branches. Remove emerging suckers from base of older trees.Pruning time: winter.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Low
    Once established, needs only occasional watering.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This is a smaller crape myrtle developed and introduced by Monrovia. Its parent is a small tree native to the South Pacific first recorded in England in 1759. Linnaeus gave the genus name to his friend, Magnus Lagerstroem. It was first grown in America by Andre Michaux at his nursery in Charleston, S.C.. Many historic sites including Mount Vernon were planted with Michaux's first varieties which remain in cultivation throughout the Carolinas today.
    Lore:
    Many assume the crape myrtle is native because it is so common in the South, but it is among the first Asian introductions in America that proved perfectly adapted to the rigors of hot, humid climates.