Provided for consumer information—Monrovia is not currently growing this plant.

  • Overview
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Shade
    Full to partial shade
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Low
    Once established, needs only occasional watering.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Average Landscape Size
    2 ft. tall and wide.
    Key Feature:
    Key Feature
    Dramatic Foliage Color
    Blooms:
    Flowering Time
    Spring
    Landscape Uses:
    Landscape Uses
  • Detail
    Plant type:Perennial
    Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
    Growth rate:Moderate
    Average landscape size:2 ft. tall and wide.
    Special features:Dramatic Foliage Color
    Foliage color:Multicolored
    Blooms:Spring
    Flower color:Blue
    Garden styleContemporary
    Design IdeasPlant this perennial in naturalistic drifts for a unique illusion of dappled sunlight in gardens beneath shade trees where soils are acidic. Ideal in quantities used as edging or plant in masses for a bold, highly visible effect. Perfect for Asian inspired urban gardens where space is limited. Well suited for container compositions that blend foliage color under shade structures, inside walled courtyards, atriums, or sideyards between tall buildings. Great choice for problem northern exposures.
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Provide well-drained soil, rich in organic matter. Feed with an acid fertilizer before spring growth.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Shade
    Full to partial shade
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Low
    Once established, needs only occasional watering.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This perennial is native to Tasmania and shares the same range as the indigenous Maori people. It's habitat is the shaded floor of tropical forests where decomposing leaves create acidic soil conditions. This species was introduced by the famed plant collector and former Director of the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew, Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker.
    Lore:
    In New Zealand, the berries of Dianella are considered bush food by indigenous cultures.