Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Slow growing to 15 to 20 ft. high, 20 to 25 ft. wide.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Attracts Birds
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Spring
Botanical Pronunciation:ki-o-NAN-thus re-TU-sus
Plant type:Tree
Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
Sunset climate zones:3 - 9, 14 - 24, 28 - 34, 39
Growth habit:Spreading
Growth rate:Slow
Average landscape size:Slow growing to 15 to 20 ft. high, 20 to 25 ft. wide.
Special features:Attracts Birds
Foliage color:Green
Blooms:Spring
Flower color:White
Garden styleAsian/Zen, Cottage, Tropical
Design IdeasThis outstanding small tree will provide perfect interest for spatially challenged front yards. Wider than tall, it will also work well as filtered shade in outdoor living spaces that can afford to be overwhelmed by large trees. Set far back in the landscape against dark evergreen trees for a gorgeous bloom spectacle in sharp contrast. Show white blossoms become luminescent in the moonlight. Also works nicely as an accent tree surrounded by high profile perennials in the lawn.
Companion PlantsThe fringe tree is outstanding with vibrantly colored perennials such as Color Flash Lime Astilbe, (Astilbe x arendsii 'Beauty of Lisse'), Farmington Michaelmas Daisy, (Aster novi-belgii 'Farmington'), Raspberry Tart Coneflower, (Echinacea purpurea 'Raspberry Tart'), Sensation Rose Meadow Sage, (Salvia nemorosa 'Meadow Sage'), and Flower Carpet Scarlet Groundcover Rose, (Rosa x 'NOA83100B').
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Watering can be reduced after establishment. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.Pruning time: winter.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
History:
There are two species of fringe tree, the first was introduced from America in the 17th century, for which the genus was named by Linnaeus from the Greek for snow and flower. The trees are native to an immense range of China, Korea and Japan. They were introduced to Britain by Robert Fortune who obtained specimens from a garden near Fuzhou. In China the best bloomers are propagated by grafting.
Lore:
In China, the young leaves of this tree are used as a substitute for tea and some are considered equal in fragrance to some of the best green teas.