Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Slow growing 6 to 8 ft. tall, 4 to 5 ft. wide.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Year-round Interest
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Does not flower
Botanical Pronunciation:PY-see-a GLAW-ka
Plant type:Conifer
Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
Sunset climate zones:1 - 7, 14 - 17
Growth rate:Slow
Average landscape size:Slow growing 6 to 8 ft. tall, 4 to 5 ft. wide.
Foliage color:Green
Blooms:Does not flower
Design IdeasThis dense pointed conifer is a perfect front yard Christmas tree for holiday lighting at small city homes. Dense growth means it's also a great screen plant that won't overgrow tight spaces. Use symmetrical form as a single accent, in matched pair or in an evenly spaced series amidst hedges and parterres. Experiment with topiary spirals or poodles for potted specimens on entries and patios, where there's no room to plant. A beautiful choice for woodland gardens or behind water features.
Companion PlantsPlant throughout the formal hedging of Boxwood and Euonymus and accompany with Rosemary, Lavender and Verbena. For a woodland setting, plant at the fringe for more sun and pair with the red and burgundy colors of Cotoneaster, Witch Hazel, and Dogwood.
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Requires less water once established. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.Pruning time: winter.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
History:
This conifer is native to a number of states adjacent to the Canadian border, through Canada into Alaska. Alberta spruce is grown as Christmas trees and fresh cut greens used in holiday decorating. Oils have some commercial value. The name Picea translates from the Latin for pitch, a sugar rich gum extracted from spruce trees. Native Americans used its gum as a salve and brewed the resin into medicinal drink for childbirth and other ailments.