Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
Average Landscape Size:
Average Landscape Size
Compact growing 5 to 8 ft. tall and 3 to 6 ft. wide.
Key Feature:
Key Feature
Fragrant
Blooms:
Flowering Time
Late spring through early summer
Botanical Pronunciation:gar-DEEN-ee-uh jas-min-NOY-deez
Plant type:Shrub
Deciduous/evergreen:Evergreen
Sunset climate zones:7 - 9, 12 - 16, 18 - 28, 31
Growth habit:Compact, Round
Growth rate:Moderate
Average landscape size:Compact growing 5 to 8 ft. tall and 3 to 6 ft. wide.
Foliage color:Green
Blooms:Late spring through early summer
Flower color:White
Garden styleAsian/Zen
Design IdeasPlant this compact, early blooming Gardenia in sunny protected spaces, such as entryways or enclosed patios, where its fragrance can be captured and enjoyed. Consider this one for transitional areas such as a doorway, at a gate or the entry to a gazebo or shade structure. With its big showy flowers, this Gardenia will be visible on moonlit nights when the blooms will practically leap out of the darkness.
Companion PlantsMix and match with other Asian garden favorites like Camellia, Azalea, Japanese Maple, Iris, Peony, and a variety of delicate ferns. Create a fragrant container planting alongside Jasmine, Lavender and Chocolate Cosmos.
Care Information
Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Provide well drained soil, rich in organic matter. Feed with an acid fertilizer after bloom. Keep roots cool with a thick layer of mulch.Pruning time: summer after flowering.
Light Needs:
Light needs: Partial Sun
Partial to full sun
Watering Needs:
Water needs: Moderate
Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
History:
Gardenia is a native of China where it has been cultivated for over a thousand years. Plants reached America directly from Asia in 1761. John Ellis cultivated them first at his South Carolina plantation. These would be the progenitor for all gardenias in England. Ellis named the genus for his friend, Dr. Alexander Garden, a physician of Charleston. Its chief propose for early cultivation was for the cut flower industry as a heavy fragrance corsage.