• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Full shade to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water regularly - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Vigorous, clinging stems quickly reach 50 to 80 ft. long.
    Key Feature:
    Showy Flowering Vine
    Blooms:
    Summer
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:hye-DRAYN-jee-uh an-NOM-al-a pet-ee-ol-LAY-riss
    Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
    Growth rate:Fast
    Average landscape size:Vigorous, clinging stems quickly reach 50 to 80 ft. long.
    Special features:Fast Growing
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Summer
    Flower color:White
    Garden styleCottage, Rustic
    Design IdeasThis is the only Hydrangea that climbs and is so vigorous it can cloak a good-sized house in no time. Being deciduous, it shades walls in summer and lets the sun warm them during winter, thus helping to conserve energy. With its clinging habit, it needs no trellis and will extend up to a second story with ease. Works well as a cloak for fences or to increase an arbor's shade. An inexpensive cover for concrete retaining walls and freestanding barrier walls.
    Companion PlantsEuonymus (Euonymus); Coral Bells (Heuchera); Hosta (Hosta); Spreading Yew (Taxus); Boxwood (Buxus)
  • Care
    Care Information
    Thrives in enriched, fertile, well-drained soils. Tolerates full sun in cool climates with consistent moisture. Avoid hot, humid conditions. Water deeply, regularly during first growing season to establish extensive root system. Feed with general purpose fertilizer. Provide support for climbing stems. Prune annually to control size.Pruning time: summer after flowering.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Shade
    Full shade to full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Water regularly - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    Hydrangea anomala is native to wooded valleys, stream banks and mountain slopes in the Himalayas and China. The subsecies petiolaris (formerly known as Hydrangea petiolaris) is native to eastern Siberia, Japan, China and South Korea. This subspecies produces longer stems and larger flower clusters, and has better winter hardiness.
    Lore:
    The genus name Hydrangea comes from hydor meaning water and aggeion meaning vessel, referring to its cup-like capsular fruit. The specific epithet comes from the Greek word anomalas, which refers to the vine-like plant habit. The subspecies name is in reference to the long petioles of this plant.