• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Full to partial shade
    Watering Needs:
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Arching branches form a mound 6 to 8 ft. tall, 5 to 6 ft. wide.
    Key Feature:
    Shade Loving
    Blooms:
    Spring
    Landscape Uses:
  • Detail
    Plant type:Shrub
    Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
    Growth rate:Fast
    Average landscape size:Arching branches form a mound 6 to 8 ft. tall, 5 to 6 ft. wide.
    Special features:Waterwise
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Spring
    Flower color:Yellow
    Flower attributesShowy Flowers
    Garden styleAsian/Zen, Cottage
    Design IdeasThis old fashioned flowering shrub is among the favored flowers of Victorian gardeners in the West and South. Exceptional in large foundation planting beds of sizeable older homes. Can lend a decidedly tropical look in colder climates if combined with exotic foliage plants. Not uncommon to find them in conjunction with old roses in large country gardens.
    Companion PlantsGroup kerria with other attractive flowering shrubs such as Rainbow Knock Out Rose, (Rosa x 'Radcor'), Renaissance Spiraea, (Spiraea x vanhouttei 'Renaissance'), Razzleberri Fringe Flower, (Loropetalum chinense 'Monraz') and Cameo Japanese Flowering Quince, (Chaenomeles japonica 'Cameo').
  • Care
    Care Information
    Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish an extensive root system. Feed regularly during the growing season with a general purpose fertilizer. Prune annually in late winter to promote vigorous new growth.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Shade
    Full to partial shade
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Needs regular watering - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    This shrub is a native of Japan and first described by Kaempfer of the Dutch East India Company in 1712. It was also recorded in Thunberg's Flora Japonica, published in 1784. Living plants did nto reach the west until 1805 when single flowered for was introduced to Key by William Kerr, and subsequently named for him.
    Lore:
    In Japan, the traditional name for this plant is Jamma Buki.