• Overview
    Light Needs:
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water regularly to maintain wet or evenly moist soil - weekly or more.
    Average Landscape Size:
    Quickly reaches 40 to 60 ft. tall and wide; 70 ft. tall in ideal conditions.
    Key Feature:
    Attractive Textured Bark
    Blooms:
    Inconspicuous; prized for foliage.
  • Detail
    Botanical Pronunciation:BET-ew-la NI-gra
    Plant type:Tree
    Deciduous/evergreen:Deciduous
    Growth rate:Fast
    Average landscape size:Quickly reaches 40 to 60 ft. tall and wide; 70 ft. tall in ideal conditions.
    Foliage color:Green
    Blooms:Inconspicuous; prized for foliage.
    Flower color:Yellow
    Garden styleRustic
    Design IdeasExcellent tree for very large homesites, parks and open space. A problem solver for low lying sites to wet for many other species. Important component of the wetland wild garden and for re-vegetating disturbed sites along river banks that benefit from extensive root stabilization of eroding banks..
    Companion PlantsClethra (Clethra); Red-Twig Dogwood (Cornus); Sweet Flag (Acorus); Dappled Willow (Salix integra); Water Iris (Iris ensata); Japanese Spurge (Pachysandra)
  • Care
    Care Information
    Thrives in deep, loamy, moist but well-drained soil amended with sand or gravel, but highly adaptable. Water deeply, regularly in first few growing seasons to establish root system; once established tolerates mild drought, but reaches maximum growth in rich, fertile, evenly moist soils. Fertilize in early spring. Seldom requires pruning.Pruning time: winter.
    Light Needs:
    Light needs: Full Sun
    Full sun
    Watering Needs:
    Water needs: Moderate
    Water regularly to maintain wet or evenly moist soil - weekly or more.
  • History & Lore
    History:
    Named for its habitat along the streams and rivers of eastern North America. Its range extends from Mass. to Florida, and Minnesota to Kansas. It was introduced to Britain by Peter Collinson who received seed or cuttings from John Bartram in the early 18th century.
    Lore:
    Infusions of the inner bark of river birch was used to treat a variety of ailments by many Native American tribes within its range.